Links4Class.com Project

Good afternoon,

Lately I have been truly inspired by teachers and their determination to use digital educational resources.  Having worked with many to overcome the struggle of having elementary school students use websites that have too many options or distractions I discovered that many of the sites use swf files (Shock Wave Small Web Format) that can be opened directly in full page views.  In thinking about their needs my response has been isolate the swf file links and to build links4class.com to allow teachers to share direct links with their students to these educational resources.

The website is housed on Weebly and uses Google Sheets to store the data and uses Google Forms and some Google Sheets scripts to create a recommendation engine and new site suggestion tool as well.  Links4class.com is sortable, searchable and has the ability to Share with Google Classroom.  Please take a look at the current resources, make suggestions, and recommend resources for other teachers.  The site continues to grow and have more links added.  Please take some time to look at this resource and share with others.

Jeran

L4C site

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“Make a copy” and share your Google Form!

Earlier this week I wanted to share a Google Form in a training, but I wanted each person to have their own copy to use in their own classroom.  I have used the trick to share other Google Drive base files by changing the end of the URL from “/edit” to “/copy”.  This works with Google Docs, Sheets & Slides (as long as you also share viewing rights to the document), but not with Forms editor.  In playing around I did discover that “/copy” will work, so here are the steps.

  1.  Create your form and design at will by adding questions and adjusting the theme.
  2. Now you need to adjust the share settings of the form.  Go to File-Add Collaborators and share the form as needed.  I choose “Anyone who has the link can edit” which is a little scary, but their is no “can view” option.  We are not going to really share the editor URL anyways, just make sure this is your template and not a form you are actively using.
  3. The last step is to view your live form (example).  This is the URL you will need, but before you share you will need to change the “/viewform” to “/copy”.  Now when you share the new live form link (updated example) the trainee will be asked if they want to make a copy.

Copy Form

Enjoy sharing your forms,

Jeran

 

Google Form for everyday use, and automatically show the students name!

I was working with a teacher on Monday who had created a Google Form that could be used to collect responses for any in-class question (ie. math problem of the day).  There was one problem with the form  and that was that the students usernames are a combination of letters and numbers, making the students for each answer difficult to identify.

Here is a simple way to solve this problem using the vlookup function and the copyDown add-on.  This is a very basic Example Form to show the data entry and an Example Response Sheet which has the instructions to setup the vlookup and copyDown features.

Screen Shot 2016-03-02 at 8.51.46 PM

Enjoy your your everyday Form,

Jeran

Email images to a Google Sites (via a shared Google Drive folder)

The other day a fellow GCT asked if she could have students take pictures and then email them to a Google Site.  I came up with the idea of an embedded (and shared) Google Drive folder that receives images using a Google Script written by Amit Agarwal.  This has really inspired me to learn how to use Google Script and see what i can do with it.  In the meantime, here are the instructions I wrote.

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Edpuzzle opens up Youtube to schools

edpuzzle

EDpuzzle.com has opened up their program so that embedded Youtube video will not be filtered out by school filters as long as Edpuzzle.com is whitelisted by your IT department.

According to an email from cofounder Quim Sabrià’s, “EDpuzzle empower teachers to use YouTube videos in their schools even if it’s blocked. The reason behind is that if a teacher considers a video appropriate, that lesson shouldn’t be blocked. Teachers know what is best for their students.”

This is welcome news as many of the video I attempted to embed assessment in by using Edpuzzle were blocked by my district.  Try out Edpuzzle.com , just sign–in with your G+ account and in no time you will have a fun new video/assessment tool for your classroom.

Jeran